Rep. Omar and the Hypocrisy of Congress

I’ll begin by saying I am not an Ilhan Omar supporter. She is dangerous due to her support of identity politics and the Gang of Four—also known as the Squad—agenda that, if implemented, will be a death knell to America. 

However, that absurd and destructive agenda is not the primary reason she is now being targeted. Congress wants to get rid of her because she consistently criticizes Israel. Anything less than enthusiastic support for the apartheid state of Israel is not permissible in the greed and corruption besmirched halls of Congress. 

It appears Omar has violated marriage, immigration, and tax laws. These are serious accusations. 

It must be said, however, there are worse violations occurring in the House and Senate. Billions of dollars are spent every year to influence our supposed “representatives.” Special interest groups, lobbyists, PACs, 527s, and a variety of organizations, foreign and domestic, are engaged in aggressive influence peddling. 

Banks, financial firms, insurance, and real estate corporations top the list, followed by “ideology/single issues,” lawyers, corporate labor unions, the “defense” industry, and a long list of interlocked transnational corporations. 

The fabled Boston Tea Party wasn’t so much about taxation as a demonstration of opposition to the stranglehold the East India Company had on the colonies. The founders mistrusted corporations. “After the nation’s founding, corporations were granted charters by the state as they are today,” writes Stephen D. Foster Jr.

Unlike today, however, corporations were only permitted to exist 20 or 30 years and could only deal in one commodity, could not hold stock in other companies, and their property holdings were limited to what they needed to accomplish their business goals. And perhaps the most important facet of all this is that most states in the early days of the nation had laws on the books that made any political contribution by corporations a criminal offense. 

“I hope that we shall crush in its birth the aristocracy of our monied corporations, which dare already to challenge our government to a trial of strength, and bid defiance to the laws of our country,” Thomas Jefferson wrote in 1816. 

“Banks have done more injury to the religion, morality, tranquility, prosperity, and even wealth of the nation than they can have done or ever will do good,” noted John Adams. 

The current Congress—largely made up of self-seeking sociopaths, lawyers, and revolving door opportunists calling themselves “public servants”—are the polar opposite of what the founders had in mind. Congress is now an open bazaar where corporate-bankster money talks and the American people are only relevant every four or eight years. 

If Rep. Omar broke the law, she needs to go. However, the same can be said for just about every member of Congress. It is currently not illegal for banks, corporations, and for foreign governments to influence Congress, although it should be, as I’m sure Jefferson and Adams would agree. 

The current environment of influence and vote-buying was created with the passage of the 14th Amendment after Lincoln’s “civil war.” It allowed lawyers for corporations, in particular, railroad corporations, to argue that equal protection under the law not only applies to individuals but corporations as well. 

By 1978, a divided Supreme Court agreed that corporations have a First Amendment right to spend money on state ballot initiatives. This was extended by the Citizens United decision in 2010.

Transnational corporations and international banks now largely control Congress, the courts, and the Executive. And yet we are expected to be outraged by a Somalian woman who may have committed marriage and immigration fraud. 

Compared to the larger fraud perpetrated by banks and corporations on the American people, the sins of Ilhan Omar are a minor issue.

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